The synesthesia – sensitivity – chronic pain link

Synesthesia has overlaps with heightened sensitivity and both have overlaps with chronic pain. All of these phenomenon overlap in me so you can see why I am so interested. It's as though chronic pain is the down side of the see-saw on which synaesthesia is the colourful gift at the highest end (I really wouldn't be without it and the sensory adventures it takes me on) and sensitivity is the mixing pot of both, made up of both pluses and minuses, depending on how challenging these heightened sensitivities make the experience of life. Exploring the sensory soup of these cross-over phenomenon, asking whether we are all born with synesthesia as science is now suggesting and looking into all the potential a deeper understanding of them holds for transforming human experience.

Mirror mirror

If some of us feel as though we are floundering under he weight of "feeling too much" then lets take a broader and more optimistic view of this. Together, we are becoming more robust and I suspect the reawakening of the mirror neurone is a signal that we are descaling our furred up neurology in readiness for a bigger experience of all that it means to be human; which is a far less isolated, self-interested, muffled-up-to the ears experience than we have long tended to believe. In my view, this is the stuff of frontline evolution.

Windows of insight

Another seminal post (from my other website) from 2014 in which I share an epiphany I had, when reading Jill Bolte Taylor’s incredible book “My Stroke of Insight” and realised how this related to the brain fog aspect of Fibromyalgia. What followed was such a rolling process of coming to understand some of the “whys” of Fibromyagia and the relationship between the left and right hemispheres of the brain that it feels important to reshare this at the beginning of a new blog that is all about finding wholeness.

spinning the light

All along the road that has been the fibromyalgia years, ‘brain fog’ (an appropriately wooly term used to describe a myriad of ‘brain symptoms’) has been such a significant part of what I have been experiencing…and, in fact, its one of the most consistently talked about aspects of fibromyalgia on forums and websites. Yet it has generally been underplayed…by me and by them…as some sort of unfortunate side effect of all the ‘other stuff’ going on with fibromyalgia, which is generally described as ‘widespread body pain’ and relatively little to do with the brain at all. What if we are stepping around the elephant in the room and our understanding of fibromyalgia’s brain symptoms is entirely pivotal to everything that is going on here?

And here’s a thought; what if fibromyalgia and any one of a long list of other chronic illnesses weren’t a sign of something ‘going wrong’ but…

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