Living with PoTS and dysautonomia

Perhaps more than any other aspect of chronic illness I have ever had to deal with, including chronic unrelenting pain, dysautonomia has the ability to throw your entire life into disarray, permeating every single aspect of your life in ways that can be as invisible to the casual bystander as they are devastating. Is there a bright side, things we can learn, ways of living with it better?

That “thing” that happened long ago

The natural response of the mind is often to shut-down vague recollections of some past event that you don't remember fondly but there lies the problem...we shut it down consciously, yet the body continues to harbour the irritation or pain, at the subconscious level, which then has no choice but to manifest as imbalance or some other symptom, that feeling of perpetuation in the body (on and on and on in perpetuity = "chronic") and, of course, where one "off-kilter" energy tends to linger, other sticky energies will attract, leading to escalation (the "snowball" effect).

Should you really wear cushioned shoes with hypermobility issues?

When you can trust your feet, when you can feel the earth beneath you and when your body knows it can really trust where it is putting its weight down, your whole body relaxes, you become more instinctual in the way you walk, your balance improves, your left and right hemispheres get toned in their relationship with one another as you walk out in nature, and you come back feeling happier, healthier and as though you have had an all-round therapy just from putting one foot in front of the other. We need to use this...its foundational for good health!

Let me tell you what is doing me good…

I am reminded by what I am about to share (a transformation in progress) that slow-steady transformation on the inside happens in just the same way, in tiny increments, and more so without the burden of high-expectations, the deadly weight of huge targets or imperatives...just simply rising up and making that small effort, day after day, with steady faith in the outcome.