Autistic burnout and the dichotomy of “living to work” when your reality tells you it’s the other way around

All my life, I have struggled with the fixed cultural idea of "work", the ability to perform a job of work, to succeed at it as others do and to not burnout when I have one (having done so in every job I have ever had). I have discovered this is yet another common factor of autism and that it is profoundly linked to chronic health issues, to lifelong feelings of shame, of not belonging and of "being a failure", associated also with strong desires to work differently to mainstream and to get out of the present culture, change priorities around and do something different with life. In fact, an autistic viewpoint on some of these things could be of great value in these times, especially post-pandemic and faced with some of the current challenges. Exploring some of these things today.

Knowing your own limitations is the direct route to your superpowers

Knowing what your weaknesses are and, importantly, owning them can be the very first step to making your "problems" much simpler to navigate, avoiding the endless re-runs of such familiar-old challenges and then claiming all those hidden strengths that are just waiting for you to notice them beyond the smokescreen of struggle...

Executive function…reappraised

For years, I told myself my very biggest area of weakness was, in fact, my greatest strength...how's that for getting your life in a knot, leading to complete burnout, though very easily done as a woman with undiagnosed autism. Exploring the complete change of priorities that came out of this...and how it has significanly altered my a-typical lifestyle for the better.