Repairing your myelin

This post takes the form of a sort of newsflash as I am inspired to follow my gut on a new supplement for myelin sheath repair. As I’ve talked about before, myelin depletion is a key factor to consider if you are hypersensitive to anything and everything (including electricity!), if you experience neuropathy, episodes of blurred vision or acute bouts of brain fog, all very familiar to me. When the myelin sheath is depleted, it can feel like driving along the road on flat tyres and processing information with wires that don’t quite want to connect…I know the feeling well and seem to register it particularly in my head and my stomach; areas susceptible to excitotoxity. Multiple sclerosis, dementia,  Alzheimer’s and certain post-menopausal health issues (and numerous other conditions) are related to this phenomenon.

I woke with that feeling this morning and it got me into reviewing what I know about myelin and what I might be lacking. B12 is absolutely crucial to this…and I admit I had become a bit haphazard about supplementing it lately (the best way is as a sublingual  methylcobalamin supplement). Also vitamin D, omega, lecithin, oestrogen and great antioxidant status are key to myelination. But, with perfect timing, a new kid showed up on my block  – the Lion’s Mane Mushroom – and what I quickly found out about this had me fizzing with excitement, not just because of its track record for rebuilding myelin and reducing electro-sensitivity symptoms but because of the way it looks.

Here’s a great article outlining the potential of lion’s mane to make a difference and there is plenty of other information around.

lions-mane-mushroom
Lion’s Mane Mushroom

This may be a little abstract for some of you but I keep noticing how nature has this weird and wonderful way of offering us clues to our own healing; often through locational juxtapositions (a cure found growing very close to the trigger “event”) or visual clues….and the bizarre looking lion’s mane mushroom strikingly resembles a sea anemone! I have always tended to visualise the way my nerves react to the environment as looking like a sea anemone reacting to the sea currents, in fact I used a gif of a sea anmone in one of my recent blogs about electro-sensitivity to try and convey this.

image_preview
Sea Anemone

When I was looking for an image to use for that article, I tripped upon research that has shown we are closely related to the sea anemone – it is our common ancestor – and that our nervous system evolved the same way. This research points at how they offer an important clue as to how our own nervous system and the highly complex signalling systems of our ion channels (electrical impulses in nerve cells that are generated by charged molecules  –  ions  – moving into and out of the cell through highly specialized ion-channel proteins that form openings in the cell membranes) originally evolved and now operate in our twenty-first century human bodies.   When we get to understand this better, perhaps by studying our common ancestor, we also get a little closer to understanding what is happening when this system malfunctions.

 

I can’t help wondering how sea anemone respond to wifi and other relentless sources of man-generated radiation…

In the meantime, just take a look at these two images and then see what your gut tells you about how Lion’s Mane Mushroom may offer an antidote to the kind of the nerve damage that is so rife in modern times. Combined with some very compelling studies that have now been carried out, I’m going with mine and have already ordered some lions mane supplements to start taking from tomorrow. Will bo-doubt post back when I have any more observations to share!

Relevant reading

Lion’s Mane Musroom – article on Wireless Education website

Complex nerve-cell signaling traced back to common ancestor of humans and sea anemones – Penn State Science article

Lion’s Mane: A Mushroom That Improves Your Memory and Mood? Huffington Post

 

Related ‘health reunited’ posts

The positive side of negative

Because B12

The oestrogen effect

Living with electro-sensitivity

 

 

Disclaimer: This website is not designed to, and should not be construed to, provide medical advice, professional diagnosis, opinion or treatment to you or any other individual, and is not intended as a substitute for medical or professional care and treatment.

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